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Your searched on: hearing disorders

Hearing Loss
Includes info on hearing loss. Discusses causes and symptoms like tinnitus, muffled hearing, and vertigo. Covers exams and tests used to diagnose hearing loss. Discusses treatment with medicine, hearing aids, or cochlear implant.

Noise-Induced Hearing Loss
Hearing loss caused by noise can occur in people of any age. It may happen suddenly or gradually. How soon it happens depends on the source and intensity of the noise. Whether a noise is harmful depends on how loud it is and how long you're around it. Noise can affect hearing in several ways. On-the-job (occupational)...

Age-Related Hearing Loss
What is age-related hearing loss? Age-related hearing loss (presbycusis) is a progressive loss of the ability to hear that happens as people get older. It affects both ears. It starts with problems hearing high-pitched sounds. Over time, the ability to hear lower-pitched sounds may be affected as well. This kind of...

Hearing Protectors
Being exposed to loud noises can result in hearing loss . As the loudness of a sound increases, the amount of time you can safely listen to the sound decreases. One way to protect your hearing is to wear hearing protectors, which reduce the loudness of the sound. Hearing protectors are especially important for those...

Hearing Loss: Should I Get Hearing Aids?
Guides through decision to get hearing aids. Explains the types of hearing aids, how they work, and how they are best used. Covers benefits and risks. Includes an interactive tool to help you make your decision.

Screening for Hearing Problems
In children The United States Preventive Services Task Force recommends that all newborns be screened for hearing loss. Many states require newborn hearing tests for all babies born in hospitals. Talk to your doctor about whether your child has been or should be tested. Even if the newborn test did not show hearing...

Medicines That Cause Hearing Loss
Medicines that damage the ear and cause hearing loss are known as ototoxic medicines. They are a common cause of hearing loss, especially in older adults who have to take medicine on a regular basis. Hearing loss caused by these types of medicine tends to happen quickly. The first symptoms usually are ringing in the...

Hearing Loss in Babies, Newborn to Age 3 Months
You can watch your baby's behavior to check for hearing loss. If you notice a change, your baby might have hearing loss. Does your baby: Listen to speech? Turn to you when you speak? Smile when spoken to? Seem to recognize your voice? Quiet his or her crying when you speak? Startle or cry at noises? Awaken to loud sounds?

Hearing Loss in Babies, Ages 4 to 6 Months
You can watch your baby's behavior to check for hearing loss. If you notice a change, your baby might have hearing loss. Does your baby: Respond to changes in your voice? Look around for the source of sounds? Notice toys that make sound?

Hearing Loss in Babies, Ages 7 Months to 1 Year
You can watch your baby's behavior to check for hearing loss. If you notice a change, your baby might have hearing loss. Does your baby: Listen when spoken to? Turn or look up when you call his or her name? Respond to requests like "come here" or "want more?" Recognize words for common items like cup, shoe, or juice?

Hearing Loss in Children, Ages 1 to 2 Years
You can watch your child's behavior to check for hearing loss. If you notice a change, your child might have hearing loss. Also, pay attention to the quality of your child's speech. Children must be able to hear well for normal speech and language to develop. Does your child: Listen to simple stories, songs, or rhymes...

Hearing Loss in Children, Ages 2 to 4 Years
You can watch your child's behavior to check for hearing loss. If you notice a change, your child might have hearing loss. Also, pay attention to the quality of your child's speech. Children must be able to hear well for normal speech and language to develop. Does your child: Follow two requests, such as "Get the ball...

Hearing Loss in Children, Age 4 Years and Older
By the age of 4, your child may tell you he or she is having trouble hearing or understanding others. You can ask your child questions about his or her hearing. You can also watch your child's behavior to check for hearing loss. If you notice a change, your child might have hearing loss. Does your child: Follow...

Cochlear Implants
A cochlear implant is a small electronic device that can help "make" sound if you have a certain type of severe hearing loss in both ears. The implant does the job of the damaged or absent nerve cells that in a normal ear make it possible to hear. Cochlear implants can be programmed according to your specific needs and...

Harmful Noise Levels
The effects of noise on hearing vary among people. Some people's ears are more sensitive to loud sounds, especially at certain frequencies. (Frequency means how low or high a tone is.) But any sound that's loud enough and lasts long enough can damage hearing and lead to hearing loss. A sound's loudness is measured in...

Congenital Heart Defects in Children
Discusses problems with how a baby's heart forms. Also looks at problems found when a person is an adult. Includes info on patent ductus arteriosus, aortic valve stenosis, and coarctation of the aorta. Covers treatment with medicine and surgery.

Congenital Heart Defects in Adults
How can you live well with a congenital heart defect? Here are some things you can do to help you live well when you have a congenital heart defect. Get regular checkups. Adults who have heart defects need routine checkups. Be sure you have a primary care physician. You might also need to see your cardiologist...

Congenital Heart Defects: Caring for Your Child
Caring for a child with a congenital heart defect can be challenging. The following tips may help you care for your child so that he or she is as healthy and comfortable as possible. These tips may also help you cope with the difficulties that parents often experience. Caring for your child in the hospital...

Cardiac Catheterization in Children
Cardiac catheterization is a procedure your doctor uses to see images and get information about your child's heart and blood vessels from the inside. It can also be done to repair some congenital heart defects. This is a kind of heart problem that your child is born with. Your doctor doesn't need to make any cuts to do...

Congenital Heart Defect Types
There are many types of congenital heart defects. If the defect lowers the amount of oxygen in the body, it is called cyanotic. If the defect doesn't affect oxygen in the body, it is called acyanotic. What are cyanotic heart defects? Cyanotic heart...